Medical Malpractice / Child Birth Malpractice Recent Success Stories

John Doe v. Hospital and Doctor, (Superior Court – Confidentiality Settlement): Baby suffered from hypoxia and traumatic brain injury during birth caused by negligence of treating doctor and hospital nursing staff. Baby was born cortically blind, with cerebral palsy and other multiple birth defects. Plaintiffs contended this was caused by medical negligence during birthing.

Total settlement $2,825,000

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John and Jane Doe v. HMO facility: The health care provider failed to diagnosis an intracranial aneurysm which ruptured and caused permanent brain damage to a 54 year old mother, grandmother and house wife. She will never work again and needs care 24/7.

Total Settlement: $2,500,000+

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Jane and John Doe v. Hospital XYZ (King County, Washington): A 53 year old father underwent surgery to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm. After being incubated, ventilated and placed in CCU, the patient was placed under 24 hour care to monitor his tracheotomy. When he improved, he was transferred from CCU to a step down floor. Because of the ongoing development of mucus, which required suctioning of his tracheotomy, it was important that the patient be monitored, assessed and suctioned, if necessary, every two hours by the attending nurses or respiratory therapists. After the patient’s transfer to the step down floor, he was not regularly monitored and suctioned. During his first night, the patient was not assessed or monitored for over five hours. As a result, he developed a mucus plug, could not breathe, and suffered respiratory arrest and heart failure. The patient was revived but suffered catastrophic brain damage. He now requires care 24-7 by his wife.

Settlement: $2,500,000

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Jane Doe v. Health Care Center (Superior Court – confidentiality settlement): Patient suffered from horrific headaches, nausea, vomiting, blurred and double vision, but was told she had the flu. Over several weeks no imaging studies were ordered of the patient’s brain to rule out an intracranial bleed or subarachnoid hemorrhage. Because of the failure of multiple healthcare providers to consider a subarachnoid hemorrhage and to rule one out by ordering a CT or MRI scan of the brain, the patient’s aneurysm ruptured, causing permanent brain damage.

Settlement $2,500,000+

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Bond v. Valley Medical Center (King County, Washington): Michael Bond, a 37 year old construction worker, went into the hospital complaining of an ailment. Incidental films showed a mass and a follow-up CT scan was read incorrectly, showing it cancerous. The attending surgeon, who held himself out as both a thoracic and general surgeon, ordered the patient to undergo a mediastinoscopy. During this biopsy of the mass, the surgeon was exploring an area nowhere near the site of the alleged mass and perforated the esophagus. The patient was sent home and returned within one hour complaining of horrific pain. He was admitted but the symptoms of an esophageal perforation were not diagnosed and treated for more than three days. The patient was then taken to the University of Washington for emergency surgery to repair and reconstruct his esophagus. He now has troubles swallowing, often regurgitates and has difficulty sleeping at night. According to experts, the surgeon both misread the films and performed the mediastinoscopy incorrectly.

Settlement: $1,200,000

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Gutierrez v. Marumanji, et. al. (Lewis Co. Superior Court ): During labor and delivery of  baby Armondo, the attending hospital and doctor failed to recognize that the baby was in fetal distress and deliver the baby sooner. To compound the neurological damage to the baby during the labor and delivery, the baby was severely burned when a hospital nurse improperly used a heating pad. Five years later, the child remains deeply scarred on his back.

Settlement: $925,000

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The Estate of Jane Doe v. Hospital: A retired patient went in for heart surgery and removal of an intra-aortic balloon pump from her femoral artery in her leg. After the IABP was removed, the client bled internally. The bleed was not timely diagnosed post-surgery and the patient bled to death.

Estate Settlement: $750,000

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The Estate of Jane Doe v. Dr . Anesthesiologist: A patient with obvious facial and neck deformities went in for a routine D & C. Preoperatively, the anesthesiologist treated the intubation as typical despite the patient’s apparent deformities and dysmorphic features. The physician proceeded to put the patient to sleep with conventional intubation but was unable to find an airway. Because the patient was overly sedated, the doctor was unable to timely awaken the patient from the paralytic drugs after she was unable to intubate and establish an airway in a timely fashion. As a result, the patient suffered severe hypoxia and brain damage and died one week later.

Estate Settlement: $750,000

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Jon Doe v. John Doe Entity: A young adolescent was injured in a playful accident and presented to the emergency department at a hospital. A physicians assistant examined the young teen and ordered a series of x-rays of his foot. The x-rays were read as negative but showed a fracture. The boy was sent home and allowed to walk on his foot for 1-2 months until he returned in continued pain. An orthopedist at the same facility read the film and diagnosed a fracture. In the interim, post traumatic arthritis set in which eventually led to a 4 joint fusion in the foot.

Settlement: $450,000

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Jane Doe v. John Doe Entity: Mrs. Doe complained of a growth on her left breast which was read as benign. No biopsy was taken or suggested. Over the next year or two it continued to grow, but the patient was reassured it was nothing to worry about. Eventually the patient sought out a second opinion. The health care provider ordered a biopsy which was malignant. This diagnosis led to a mastectomy and stem cell transplant.

Settlement: $450,000+

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John Doe v. John & Jane Doe, M.D.: John Doe’s below the knee amputation resulted from the failure of the health care provider to properly care for and treat a diabetic foot ulcer, which led to total contact casting. The health care provider negligently asked the patient to return in 2 weeks rather than 3-5 days to check the cast and the foot. The delay caused a loss of blood flow and circulation to his foot. Gangrene set in, making amputation necessary.

Settlement: Confidential. Settled before trial.

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Mr. & Mrs. Jane Doe v. Drs. Doe: Mrs. Doe was hospitalized at 37 weeks pregnant. It was noted that her baby was in acute fetal distress. A decision was made by a covering OB-GYN not to deliver the full-term baby. Patient was sent home and several days later, spontaneously ruptured and delivered a still born. Suit was filed alleging that the health care providers were negligent in failing to induce labor in a full term baby which was in acute fetal distress as noted in the fetal heart monitoring strips.

Settlement: Confidential. Settled before trial.

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John Doe v. Hospital and Doctor (Superior Court – confidentiality settlement): Retired gentleman suffered from diabetes and peripheral neuropathy. The patient had multiple ulcers and skin evulsions on his foot. The treating podiatrist recommended contact casting. The follow up visit was scheduled for over two weeks later, rather than a few days. As a result, patient developed gangrene which resulted in a below the knee amputation. Settlement numbers are confidential.

Settlement: Confidential. Settled before trial.

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